Supplementing Your Faith Sunday School Lesson Take Aways

Dear Class:

 

Today we began our study of the Book of Acts (Part 2) as we looked at Acts 13.  Chapter 13 marks a turning point in the Book of Acts.  Whereas chapters 1-12 were focused on how the church was launched in Jerusalem and its aftermath in Judea and Samaria, we’ll now see how the church expanded to the Gentile nations through intentional missionary activity starting with the launch of Paul’s first missionary journey.

Who is the greatest user of people that you know?  You may be thinking about some great coaches or generals or politicians.  But I submit that the greatest user of people in world history is God.  He used people that we wouldn’t even consider using to accomplish His objectives.  Consider Moses, Rahab, Gideon, David, Peter, and Paul.  If we were the casting director for a production of God’s epic “Plan of Redemption” we wouldn’t have cast most of the characters that God used.  Why is that?  It’s because we naturally look for characters that possess the talents for the role.  Rather God looks for characters through whom He can operate.  He’s the one with the talent to get the job done; what He needs is someone willing to submit to His will.

As we go through our study of the Book of Acts we’ll see how God uses someone who was so diametrically opposed to the Gospel message that he actively and brutally persecuted believers – the Apostle Paul – a more unlikely evangelist for the “Way” you’d be hard pressed to name.
________________________________________________________

Note:

Please note that next Sunday, Dec. 10, we will continue our study of Acts 13-28 with a focus on Acts 14.  In this chapter we see how Paul and Barnabas moved on from Antioch in Pisidia to three cities in an adjoining region: Iconium, Lystra, and Derbe.  They encountered enthusiastic Gentile crowds as well as some fierce Jewish opposition to their evangelizing.

 

Reminder:

Sat., Dec. 9 (2:00-6:00pm) is our class Christmas event.  I hope to see you there.

 

 

Our class discussion migrated toward the question about how separated from the world should we Christians be.  I suggested that we might do well to ask ourselves if we spend too little time ministering to the lost because we spend most of our time fellowshipping with other believers.  Please know that I’m not suggesting that the time we spend in fellowship with saved people is wasted.  But I am asking if we’re spending enough time ministering to the lost as our Lord did.

In His prayer of intercession for His disciples in John 17 and indeed for all “those who will believe in Me” John 17:19 (that’s us), Jesus asks for their protection from “the evil one” as we go into the world.  “I do not pray that You should take them out of the world, but that You should keep them from the evil one. They are not of the world, just as I am not of the world” (John 17:15-16).  Is it God’s intention to only use us when we are fellowshipping with other believers?  I’m reminded of the account in Mark 2:16-17 of Jesus being criticized by the Pharisees for associating with “sinners”And when the scribes and Pharisees saw Him eating with the tax collectors and sinners, they said to His disciples, “How is it that He eats and drinks with tax collectors and sinners?”  When Jesus heard it, He said to them, “Those who are well have no need of a physician, but those who are sick.  I did not come to call the righteous, but sinners, to repentance.”
________________________________________________________

Note:

Please note that next Sunday, Dec. 3, we will begin our study of Acts 13-28 with a focus on Acts 13.  In this chapter we see how Paul and Barnabas were sent out by the church in Antioch to share the gospel with people very different from themselves.  We also see how universally appealing the power of the gospel message was.

 

Special Note:

Please save Sat., Dec. 9 (2:00-6:00pm) as the date of our class Christmas fellowship.  Look for details in a forthcoming email.

 

 

Our class discussion migrated toward the question about how separated from the world should we Christians be.  I suggested that we might do well to ask ourselves if we spend too little time ministering to the lost because we spend most of our time fellowshipping with other believers.  Please know that I’m not suggesting that the time we spend in fellowship with saved people is wasted.  But I am asking if we’re spending enough time ministering to the lost as our Lord did.

In His prayer of intercession for His disciples in John 17 and indeed for all “those who will believe in Me” John 17:19 (that’s us), Jesus asks for their protection from “the evil one” as we go into the world.  “I do not pray that You should take them out of the world, but that You should keep them from the evil one. They are not of the world, just as I am not of the world” (John 17:15-16).  Is it God’s intention to only use us when we are fellowshipping with other believers?  I’m reminded of the account in Mark 2:16-17 of Jesus being criticized by the Pharisees for associating with “sinners”And when the scribes and Pharisees saw Him eating with the tax collectors and sinners, they said to His disciples, “How is it that He eats and drinks with tax collectors and sinners?”  When Jesus heard it, He said to them, “Those who are well have no need of a physician, but those who are sick.  I did not come to call the righteous, but sinners, to repentance.”
________________________________________________________

Note:

Please note that next Sunday, Dec. 3, we will begin our study of Acts 13-28 with a focus on Acts 13.  In this chapter we see how Paul and Barnabas were sent out by the church in Antioch to share the gospel with people very different from themselves.  We also see how universally appealing the power of the gospel message was.

 

Special Note:

Please save Sat., Dec. 9 (2:00-6:00pm) as the date of our class Christmas fellowship.  Look for details in a forthcoming email.

 

 

0 Comments

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

CONTACT US

We're not around right now. But you can send us an email and we'll get back to you, asap.

Sending

©2017 Common Thread Ministries | REBUILDING THE FOUNDATIONS OF PRAYER (Psalm 11:3)

Log in with your credentials

Forgot your details?

%d bloggers like this: